About

About Bill

About-Bill-VineyardBill Vineyard is a husband, father of four, Kansan, and pseudo-philosopher.

His discovery of faith is based on a lifelong journey of recovery – first working to confront his own personal war against addiction, and then through a life devoted to helping the local suffering alcoholic and addict.

“Which is more difficult, to awaken one who sleeps or to awaken one who, awake, dreams that he is awake?”
– Soren Kierkegaard. Works of Love. 1847.

From the platform of a family-owned alcohol and drug rehabilitation center, Bill worked for 35 years as a LAC conducting a myriad of group sessions from step work and cognitive activities to the complex nature of role plays and psychodramas. Over that time, he completed more than 30,000 drug and alcohol offense-related evaluations and met with thousands of outpatient and inpatient clients.

The Common Man’s Champion

Bill now works one-on-one as a friend and peer in recovery for those in need, especially those who have nowhere else to turn. He believes that within each of us, below the many masks and scars we acquire throughout our troubled lives, there still remains the core of our true self – our most natural and pure state of God-given talent, spirit, and expression.

Bill is an advocate of traditional 12-step recovery. He cherishes the Big Book and has one of the most complete and dynamic Søren Kierkegaard libraries in the nation. He enjoys front porch musings with his family, down-home organic cooking, and watching the time and the wind blow change across the Kentucky Bluegrass prairie surrounding his home.

“I have found that the process of discovering who I really am begins with knowing who I really don’t want to be.”
–Alcoholics Anonymous

His Pillars of Cool include Elvis Presley, George Jones, Blackbear Bosin, Harley Davidson, and anyone who practices the art of plumbing. When he’s not reading philosophical texts, he morphs into a history buff – a Cliff Clavin of sorts. Some of his favorite areas of study include Greco-Roman spirituality and civilization, the history of the world, psychology, and health solutions based on an organic lifestyle.

The Recovery Effect

The Recovery Effect was designed as an expressive platform for my personal studies, work experience, and spiritual mission. It is my intention to bring honest and faithful guidance to any person starved of the comfort and resolve one finds in living a life of recovery.

But by the grace of God…from my personal “trip” through life and addiction, I’ve grown to understand the alcoholic and addict quite well. I’ve also come to understand the necessity of a devout and loving recovery community. For any of you who are in immediate need, you will certainly find immediate help and love within the walls of an AA or recovery based meeting.

Please take the hatred elsewhere. If the topics presented in this blog offend you in any way, thoughtfully consider why they offend you. I am not here to impose my principles on anyone, or debate them. I merely aim to extend a helping hand to any neighbor in need. With the right mindset, you might just walk away with something useful to chew on.

“For I say, through the grace given unto me, to every man that is among you, not to think [of himself] more highly than he ought to think; but to think soberly, according as God hath dealt to every man the measure of faith.”
-Romans 12:3

GET MORE INSTAGRAM INSPIRATION

  • Only Step One, where we made the 100 percent admission we were powerless over alcohol, can be practiced with absolute perfection. The remaining eleven Steps state perfect ideals. They are goals toward which we look, and measuring sticks by which we estimate our progress. 
The Recovery Effect Podcast – Episode 1: Powerless
http://therecoveryeffect.com/podcast/podcast1/
  • Why all this insistence that every AA must hit bottom first? The answer is that few people will sincerely try to practice the AA program unless they have hit bottom.  For practicing AA’s remaining eleven steps means the adoption of attitudes and actions that almost no alcoholic who is still drinking can dream of taking. Who wants to confess his faults to another and make restitution for harm done? Who cares anything about a Higher Power, let along meditation and prayer? Who wants to sacrifice time and energy in trying to carry A.A.’s message not the next sufferer? No, the average alcoholic, self-centered in the extreme, doesn’t care for this prospect — unless he has to do these things in order to stay alive himself. 
The Recovery Effect Podcast – Episode 23: 
Our Greatest Enemy, Part 1
  • 
The only requirement for AA membership is an honest desire to stop drinking. (Forward to First Edition AA BB)

The Recovery Effect Podcast – Episode 20: 
God’s Requirements
  • As we have seen, self-searching is the means by which we bring new vision, action, and grace to bear upon the dark and negative side of our natures.  It is a step in the development of that kind of humility that makes it possible for us to receive God’s help.  Yet it is only a step. We will want to go further. We will want the good that is in us all, even the worst of us, to flower and grow.

The Recovery Effect Podcast – Episode 3: 
The Highest Thing a Human Being Will Ever Know
http://therecoveryeffect.com/podcast/podcast3/
  • The need for ego reduction. It is common knowledge that a return of the full-fledged ego can happen at any time. Years of sobriety are no insurance against its resurgence. No AA's, regardless of their veteran status, can ever relax their guard against a reviving ego. The function of surrender in AA is now clear. It produces that stopping by causing the individual to say, "I quit. I give up on my headstrong ways. I've learned my lesson." Very often for the first time in that individual's adult career, he has encountered the necessary discipline that halts him in his headlong pace. Actually, he is lucky to have within him the capacity to surrender. It is that which differentiates him from the wild animals. And this happens because we can surrender and truly feel, "Thy will, not mine, be done. "Unfortunately, that ego will return unless the individual learns to accept a disciplined way of life, which means the tendency toward ego comeback is permanently checked.  This is not news to AA members. They have learned that a single surrender is not enough. Under the wise leadership of the AA "founding fathers" the need for continued endeavor to maintain that miracle has been steadily stressed. The Twelve Steps urge repeated inventories, not just one, and the Twelfth Step is in itself a routine reminder that one must work at preserving sobriety. Moreover, it is referred to as Twelfth Step work—which is exactly what it is. By that time, the miracle is for the other person. -Dr. Harry M. Tiebout, M.D.

The Recovery Effect Podcast – Episode 23: 
Our Greatest Enemy, Part 1
http://therecoveryeffect.com/podcast/podcast23/

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